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Thu 27 Jul 2017 21:51:23


 
 

Steam Loco Class Information

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Class Details

Grouping : Great Western Railway
Configuration : 4-6-0
Common Name : King
Designer : Collett

Introduced 1927. Collett "King" design. All modified with 4-row superheater from 1947 and with double chimney from 1955.

Weight:
Loco 89 tons 0 cwt Driving Wheel: 6' 6"
Tend 46 tons 14 cwt Boil Press: 250lb/sq in Su
Cylinders: Valve Gear: Inside Walschaerts with rocking
Four 16?" x 28" TE: 40,285 lb shaft (piston valves)


Total Locos for Class - 30

 

6000
6001
6002

6003
6004
6005

6006
6007
6008

6009
6010
6011

6012
6013
6014

6015
6016
6017

6018
6019
6020

6021
6022
6023

6024
6025
6026

6027
6028
6029


Images for Loco Class 6000

GWR Class 6000 King 4-6-0 No. 6000
Image Owner/Copyright: Unknown
Views: 1004
Comments: 1


No. 6000 King George V in British Railways green livery with double chimney and

presentation bell above the front buffer beam. Official photo.


GWR Class 6000 King 4-6-0 No. 6026
Image Owner/Copyright: Unknown
Views: 1051
Comments: 0


No. 6026 King John. Side on view in British Railways green livery with single

chimney. Official photo.


GWR Class 6000 King 4-6-0 No. 6000
Image Owner/Copyright: Unknown
Views: 578
Comments: 0


No. 6000 King George V in GWR green livery with single chimney and presentation bell

above the front buffer beam. Official photo.


GWR Class 6000 King 4-6-0 No. 6000
Image Owner/Copyright: Unknown
Views: 745
Comments: 0


No. 6000 King George V in grey photographic livery with single chimney. Official

photo.


GWR Class 6000 King 4-6-0 No. 6011
Image Owner/Copyright: Unknown
Views: 503
Comments: 1


No. 6011 King James I in GWR green livery with single chimney. Official photo.


BR/GWR Collett 4-6-0 Class 6000 King 6022 Wolverhampton Low Level Station 1961
Date Photo Taken: 06/01/1961
Date Uploaded 04/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 7066
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear

BR/GWR C. B. Collett Class Class 6000 King No. 6022 'King Edward III' at Wolverhampton Low Level Station on 6th January 1961. Built at Swindon Works in June 1930, it was withdrawn from 84A Wolverhampton Stafford Rd shed in September 1962 and cut up by Cox & Danks, Oldbury in June 1963.

The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King was a class of 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. With the exception of one Pacific (The Great Bear), they were the largest locomotives the GWR built. They were named after kings of the United Kingdom and of England, beginning with the reigning monarch, King George V, and going back through history. Following the death of King George V, the highest-numbered engine was renamed after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter, the next-highest engine was also renamed after the new King. The class was designed under the direction of C. B. Collett, as an enlarged version of Collett's Castle Class, which in turn was an enlargement of George Jackson Churchward's Star Class.

Three Kings are preserved; 6000 'King George V' at the National Railway Museum, York on static display. Only original height King; 6023 'King Edward II' at the Great Western Society, Didcot Railway Centre and is operational; 6024 'King Edward I' owned by Jeremy Hosking is at the West Somerset Railway. Its main line certificate expired March 2012, with overhaul scheduled to take place at the West Somerset Railway. The latter two were both rescued from Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales.

A trainspotter, Perter Orr, wearing a donkey jacket poses by the side number plate.

This was one of my first railway photos taken with a Kodak Box Camera, which had a fixed shutter speed and apparture setting. Because of the inability to adjust focus, the small lens aperture and the low sensitivity of the sensitive materials available, the cameras worked best in brightly lit daylit scenes when the subject is within the hyperfocal distance for the lens and of subjects that move little during the exposure - snapshots. You pointed the camera at the subject, pressed the shutter button and hoped for the best, especially when using the flash as in this case!


BR/GWR Collett 4-6-0 Class 6000 King No. 6024 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1965
Date Photo Taken: 16/05/1964
Date Uploaded 09/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 10466
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR C. B. Collett Class Class 6000 King No. 6024 'King Edward I' at at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 12th August 1965. Built at Swindon Works in June 1930. It was withdrawn from 86C Cardiff Canton shed in June 1962, and sent to Swindon for breaking up. However, in light of the instalation of a new bridge west of Bristol towards South Wales, it was coupled to its twin, 6023 King Edward II, and towed to the bridge for weight testing purposes Resultantly, with them now being closer to South Wales than Swindon, both locomotives survived and ended up being sold to Woodham Brothers scrapyard in Barry, South Wales, where they languished in the company of 300 other locomotives.

Inspired by preserved class-mate No. 6000 King George V's 1971 breach of British Rail's steam ban, in 1973 the King Preservation Society wanted to restore a locomotive to mainline condition. Both Nos. 6023 and 6024 were available for purchase, but No. 6024 was preferred, because after a derailment in the Barry yard No. 6023 had had its rear driving wheels torched through, and at the time was considered beyond repair.

No 6024 was bought for £4,000 in 1974, but, like many of the other remaining locomotives, was missing significant components, including: its double-chimney (currently fitted to No. 6000); piston, connecting and eccentric rods; and its slide-bars had been cut through.

The 36th locomotive to be rescued from Barry, No. 6024 was moved to the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre at Quainton Road. After 16 years, including the creation of the Club100 funding initiative, on 2 February 1989, No. 6024 moved again under its own power. Re-commissioned on 26 April 1989 by HRH the Duke of Gloucester, in October 1989 the engine was moved by low-loader from Quainton Road to the Birmingham Railway Museum, from where it completed its mainline test runs. On 15 April 1990, it resumed its mainline career hauling revenue-earning passenger trains.

The locomotive is currently undergoing a 10 yearly heavy general overhaul at the West Somerset Railway's workshops at Minehead, Somerset, from April 2012.

Three Kings are preserved; 6000 'King George V' at the National Railway Museum, York on static display. Only original height King; 6023 'King Edward II' at the Great Western Society, Didcot Railway Centre and is operational; 6024 'King Edward I' owned by Jeremy Hosking is at the West Somerset Railway. Its main line certificate expired March 2012, with overhaul scheduled to take place at the West Somerset Railway. The latter two were both rescued from Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales.

The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King was a class of 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. With the exception of one Pacific (The Great Bear), they were the largest locomotives the GWR built. They were named after kings of the United Kingdom and of England, beginning with the reigning monarch, King George V, and going back through history. Following the death of King George V, the highest-numbered engine was renamed after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter, the next-highest engine was also renamed after the new King. The class was designed under the direction of C. B. Collett, as an enlarged version of Collett's Castle Class, which in turn was an enlargement of George Jackson Churchward's Star Class.

A trainspotter, Howie Milburn, with an Ilford Sportsman camera and wearing a polo neck shirt, jacket and trousers rises from the steam pipe which has just collapsed while he sat on it!


BR/GWR Collett 4-6-0 Class 6000 King No. 6024 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 12/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 4723
Comments: 1

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR C. B. Collett Class Class 6000 King No. 6024 'King Edward I' at at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Swindon Works in June 1930. It was withdrawn from 86C Cardiff Canton shed in June 1962, and sent to Swindon for breaking up. However, in light of the instalation of a new bridge west of Bristol towards South Wales, it was coupled to its twin, 6023 King Edward II, and towed to the bridge for weight testing purposes Resultantly, with them now being closer to South Wales than Swindon, both locomotives survived and ended up being sold to Woodham Brothers scrapyard in Barry, South Wales, where they languished in the company of 300 other locomotives.

Inspired by preserved class-mate No. 6000 King George V's 1971 breach of British Rail's steam ban, in 1973 the King Preservation Society wanted to restore a locomotive to mainline condition. Both Nos. 6023 and 6024 were available for purchase, but No. 6024 was preferred, because after a derailment in the Barry yard No. 6023 had had its rear driving wheels torched through, and at the time was considered beyond repair.

No 6024 was bought for £4,000 in 1974, but, like many of the other remaining locomotives, was missing significant components, including: its double-chimney (currently fitted to No. 6000); piston, connecting and eccentric rods; and its slide-bars had been cut through.

The 36th locomotive to be rescued from Barry, No. 6024 was moved to the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre at Quainton Road. After 16 years, including the creation of the Club100 funding initiative, on 2 February 1989, No. 6024 moved again under its own power. Re-commissioned on 26 April 1989 by HRH the Duke of Gloucester, in October 1989 the engine was moved by low-loader from Quainton Road to the Birmingham Railway Museum, from where it completed its mainline test runs. On 15 April 1990, it resumed its mainline career hauling revenue-earning passenger trains.

The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King was a class of 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. With the exception of one Pacific (The Great Bear), they were the largest locomotives the GWR built. They were named after kings of the United Kingdom and of England, beginning with the reigning monarch, King George V, and going back through history. Following the death of King George V, the highest-numbered engine was renamed after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter, the next-highest engine was also renamed after the new King. The class was designed under the direction of C. B. Collett, as an enlarged version of Collett's Castle Class, which in turn was an enlargement of George Jackson Churchward's Star Class.

Three Kings are preserved; 6000 'King George V' at the National Railway Museum, York on static display. Only original height King; 6023 'King Edward II' at the Great Western Society, Didcot Railway Centre and is operational; 6024 'King Edward I' owned by Jeremy Hosking is at the West Somerset Railway. Its main line certificate expired March 2012, with overhaul scheduled to take place at the West Somerset Railway. The latter two were both rescued from Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales.

A schoolboy trainspotter in his school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, short trousers and knee socks, stands on the engine beside the steampipe and below the double chimney. By 1966, school caps and shorts were no longer worn by the vast majority of boys, only public and grammar schools hanging on to them.


GWR King 6000 King Class 4-6-0 No 6024 at Kingswear 2011
Date Photo Taken: 18/09/2011
Date Uploaded 01/08/2016
Image Owner/Copyright: Phil Watkins
Views: 235
Comments: 0


GWR Collett King Class 6000 4-6-0 No 6024 'King Edward l' at Kingswear, Devon (Dartmouth Steam Railway) with the Torbay Express on 18 September 2011. Built at Swindon Works in June 1930, it was withdrawn from 86C Cardiff Canton shed in June 1962. After withdrawal, it was sent to Woodham Brothers scrapyard in Barry, South Wales, where it remained for a number of years before being bought for preservation. It returned to steam in 1989 and has since been certified for mainline running. The locomotive is currently undergoing a 10 yearly major overhaul to mainline running condition. It is preserved and owned by the Royal Scot Locomotive and General Trust.

The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King is a class of 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. With the exception of one Pacific (The Great Bear), they were the largest locomotives the GWR built. They were named after kings of the United Kingdom and of England, beginning with the reigning monarch, King George V, and going back through history. Following the death of King George V, the highest-numbered engine was renamed after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter, the next-highest engine was also renamed after the new King.

After developing the new GWR Castle class from George Jackson Churchward's GWR Star class, Chief mechanical engineer C.B. Collett was faced with the need to develop an even more powerful locomotive to pull 13+ carriage express trains. Resultantly, during planning and construction, the new engine design was dubbed the 'Super-Castle'.

With the class to be originally named after notable cathedrals, in light of an invitation to feature in the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's (B&O) centenary celebrations, the GWR decided to make them more notable by naming the class after British Kings.

Of the 31 built, only 30 were in service simultaneously. The original no. 6007 King William III was written off after an accident near Shrivenham on 15 January 1936, and was condemned on 5 March 1936. A replacement was built which may have incorporated some parts from the damaged locomotive; it took the same number and name, and was added to stock on 24 March 1936.

Two of the three preserved Kings (6000 King George V and 6024 King Edward I) have operated on the main line in preservation. 6023 King Edward II is due to be main line certified in the near future


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