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Sat 01 Nov 2014 00:52:44


 
 

Steam Loco Class Information

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Class Details

Grouping : Great Western Railway
Configuration : 2-6-0
Common Name :
Designer : Churchward

Introduced 1911. Churchward GWR design.
(a) Introduced 1925. With detail alterations affecting weight.
(b) Introduced 1932. With side-window cabs and detail alterations. Renumbered into 73XX series 1956-59 after further detail alterations to reduce weight.
Some temp. converted to oil burning in 1947 - all reconverted back to coal.

Weight:
Loco 62 tons 0 cwt Driving Wheel: 5' 8"
64 tons 0 cwt (a)
65 tons 6 cwt (b)
Tend 40 tons 0 cwt Boil Press: 200lb/sq in Su
Cylinders: Valve Gear: Stephenson (piston valves)
Two 18?" x 30" (outside) TE: 25,670 lb


Total Locos for Class - 241

 

4303
4318
4320
4326
4337
4353
4358
4365
4375
4377
4381
4386
5300
5302
5303
5305
5306
5307
5309
5310
5311
5312
5313
5314
5315

5316
5317
5318
5319
5320
5321
5322
5323
5324
5325
5326
5327
5328
5330
5331
5332
5333
5334
5335
5336
5337
5338
5339
5340
5341

5343
5344
5345
5346
5347
5348
5349
5350
5351
5353
5355
5356
5357
5358
5359
5360
5361
5362
5364
5365
5367
5368
5369
5370
5371

5372
5373
5374
5375
5376
5377
5378
5379
5380
5381
5382
5384
5385
5386
5388
5390
5391
5392
5393
5394
5395
5396
5397
5398
5399

6300
6301
6302
6303
6304
6305
6306
6307
6308
6309
6310
6311
6312
6313
6314
6316
6317
6318
6319
6320
6321
6322
6323
6324
6325

6326
6327
6328
6329
6330
6331
6332
6333
6334
6335
6336
6337
6338
6339
6340
6341
6342
6343
6344
6345
6346
6347
6348
6349
6350

6351
6352
6353
6354
6355
6356
6357
6358
6359
6360
6361
6362
6363
6364
6365
6366
6367
6368
6369
6370
6371
6372
6373
6374
6375

6376
6377
6378
6379
6380
6381
6382
6383
6384
6385
6386
6387
6388
6389
6390
6391
6392
6393
6394
6395
6396
6397
6398
6399
7300 a

7301 a
7302 a
7303 a
7304 a
7305
7306
7307
7308
7309
7310
7311
7312
7313
7314
7315
7316
7317
7318
7319
7320
7321
9300 b
9301 b
9302 b
9303 b

9304 b
9305 b
9306 b
9307 b
9308 b
9309 b
9310 b
9311 b
9312 b
9313 b
9314 b
9315 b
9316 b
9317 b
9318 b
9319 b


Images for Loco Class 4300

GWR Class 4300 2-6-0 No. 9303
Image Owner/Copyright: Unknown
Views: 1730
Comments: 0


No. 9303 with side window cab in British Railway Black Livery


BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 at Woodhams Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 02/09/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 48
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 (built as No. 9303) at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Swindon Works in February 1932, it was withdrawn from 86G Pontypool Road shed in April 1964 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It is preserved at the Severn Valley Railway on static display. A future overhaul is possible with return to its original condition. 9303 is one of the final batch of 342 locomotives built between 1911 and 1932. They were built with larger cabs and had a weight attached to the buffer beam to place more weight on the leading pony wheels. This was done to reduce the wear on the leading driving wheels. In 1958 the weight was removed from the buffer beam to give the locomotive more route availability. At the same time it was renumbered 7325. The plan is to replace the missing weight at the next overhaul so it can run as 9303.

The class was introduced in 1911 to a G.J. Churchward design. 342 were built until 1932. They were initially numbered in the 4300-99, 5300-99, 6300 - 6399 and 7300 - 7321 ranges. The 4300 Moguls were the maids of all work on the GWR network and later the Western Region of British Railways. Employing a Standard number 4 boiler and the support struts similar to those fitted to the '2800' class, the class very quickly earned an excellent reputation in its ability to handle most types of traffic, from local stopping goods to main line expresses.

After the first twenty locomotives were built, the frames of subsequent engines were lengthened by 9 inches at the rear to give better access for maintenance as well as providing more room in the cab. Of the class 88 were withdrawn in the 1930s, and the wheels and motion of 80 were used for the Grange Class and 8 for Manor Class engines. The advent of the Second World War in 1939 brought a halt to the conversions. 5322 preserved in WWI Railway Operating Division khaki livery

Eleven examples of the class were transported to France during World War I in the service of the Railway Operating Division of the British Army and these were 5319 - 5326 and 5328 - 5330. One of these survives in preservation. Of the 342 engines built only two have been preserved.


BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 5322 at Woodhams Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 02/09/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 51
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 5322 at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Swindon Works in August 1917, it was withdrawn from 86G Pontypool Road shed in April 1964 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales.

Miraculously, as the sole surviving early 43xx sent to Woodham Brothers of Barry that avoided the cutter's torch, this gem was spotted there, and by 1969, after considerable persuasion need to secure its release and was acquired by a Didcot Railway Society member. It was the first ex-Great Western locomotive to leave the scrapyard for preservation, it was towed to Caerphilly in 1969. There, a small but devoted band of members of the Society's South Wales Group restored it, in the open, to working order.

The move to Didcot took place in 1973, she continued to be used on open days until around 1975 when she was stopped for various reasons. The owner at that time believed that items of historical value should not be restored, but maintained in the condition they are in. This meant that the engine stood as it was, static display only. It then passed into the ownership of the Society, this done a fund was started to restore the engine. Thus since the early 90s various bits have been overhauled, the cab was completely refurbished, the wheels and motion have been tended to, the boiler has been removed and the tender stripped down. Slowly the engine was returned to its 1919 appearance until she was finally ready to return to traffic in November 2008.

In November 2011 the locomotive was disguised as Russian locomotive and starred in a film version of Anna Karenina. In May 2012 she was turned out in BR black livery.

The class was introduced in 1911 to a G.J. Churchward design. 342 were built until 1932. They were initially numbered in the 4300-99, 5300-99, 6300 - 6399 and 7300 - 7321 ranges. The 4300 Moguls were the maids of all work on the GWR network and later the Western Region of British Railways. Employing a Standard number 4 boiler and the support struts similar to those fitted to the '2800' class, the class very quickly earned an excellent reputation in its ability to handle most types of traffic, from local stopping goods to main line expresses.

After the first twenty locomotives were built, the frames of subsequent engines were lengthened by 9 inches at the rear to give better access for maintenance as well as providing more room in the cab. Of the class 88 were withdrawn in the 1930s, and the wheels and motion of 80 were used for the Grange Class and 8 for Manor Class engines. The advent of the Second World War in 1939 brought a halt to the conversions. 5322 preserved in WWI Railway Operating Division khaki livery

Eleven examples of the class were transported to France during World War I in the service of the Railway Operating Division of the British Army and these were 5319 - 5326 and 5328 - 5330. One of these survives in preservation. Of the 342 engines built only two have been preserved.


BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 at Woodhams Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 12/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 166
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR Churchward 2-6-0 Class 4300 No. 7325 (built as No. 9303) at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Swindon Works in February 1932, it was withdrawn from 86G Pontypool Road shed in April 1964 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It is preserved at the Severn Valley Railway on static display. A future overhaul is possible with return to its original condition. 9303 is one of the final batch of 342 locomotives built between 1911 and 1932. They were built with larger cabs and had a weight attached to the buffer beam to place more weight on the leading pony wheels. This was done to reduce the wear on the leading driving wheels. In 1958 the weight was removed from the buffer beam to give the locomotive more route availability. At the same time it was renumbered 7325. The plan is to replace the missing weight at the next overhaul so it can run as 9303.

The class was introduced in 1911 to a G.J. Churchward design. 342 were built until 1932. They were initially numbered in the 4300-99, 5300-99, 6300 - 6399 and 7300 - 7321 ranges. The 4300 Moguls were the maids of all work on the GWR network and later the Western Region of British Railways. Employing a Standard number 4 boiler and the support struts similar to those fitted to the '2800' class, the class very quickly earned an excellent reputation in its ability to handle most types of traffic, from local stopping goods to main line expresses.

After the first twenty locomotives were built, the frames of subsequent engines were lengthened by 9 inches at the rear to give better access for maintenance as well as providing more room in the cab. Of the class 88 were withdrawn in the 1930s, and the wheels and motion of 80 were used for the Grange Class and 8 for Manor Class engines. The advent of the Second World War in 1939 brought a halt to the conversions. 5322 preserved in WWI Railway Operating Division khaki livery

Eleven examples of the class were transported to France during World War I in the service of the Railway Operating Division of the British Army and these were 5319 - 5326 and 5328 - 5330. One of these survives in preservation. Of the 342 engines built only two have been preserved.

A schoolboy trainspotter on a school railway society trip in his school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, short trousers and knee socks, poses in front of the loco. By 1966, school caps and shorts were no longer worn by the vast majority of boys, only public and grammar schools hanging on to them.


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