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British Railway Steam Locomotive

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Please read this statement on the accuracy of the data shown below

Note: To Obtain Consistency in the Steam System, Shed Codes used are those Registered at Nationalisation on 1st January 1948
Number34012 b
2nd Grouping Number
1st Grouping Numbersr 112
2nd Pre Grouping Number
1st Pre Grouping Number
Works/Lot Number
NameLaunceston
Class CodeWCBB
DesignerBulleid
Designation4-6-2
Built31/10/1945
Builder
1948 Shed72A Exmouth Junction
Last Shed71B Bournemouth
Withdrawn31/12/1966
Disposal detailsCashmores, Newport.
DisposalCut Up
Disposal Date31/05/1967
NotesRenumbered Jun 1948. Rebuilt Eastleigh Jan 1958

Class Information

Introduced 1945. Bulleid 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' lightweight development of his 'Merchant Navy' Class with air smoothed casing, high boiler pressure, multiple-jet blastpipe and chain-driven Bulleid valve gear.

Locod originally built for use on the Eastern Section were given 'Battle of Britain' names, While locos originally built for use in the West of England were given 'West Country' names.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

(a) Temporarily converted for oil burning in 1947, then reconverted back.

(b) Rebuilt from 1957 with lower boiler pressure, Walschaerts valve gear, multiple-jet blastpipe and large diameter chimney. Air smoothing removed.

(c) 34036 = both (a) and (b)

(e) 34064 Fitted with Geisl oblong ejector in 1962.

Weight:
Loco 86 tons 0 cwt, 90 tons 1 cwt (b) Driving Wheel: 6' 2"
Tend 40 tons 10 cwt to Boil Press: 280lb/sq in Su then reduced
50 tons 0 cwt (various) to 250lb/sq in Su; 250lb/sq in Su (b)
Cylinders: Valve Gear: Bulleid (piston valves)
Walschaerts (piston valves)(b)
Three 16 3/8" x 24" TE: 31,050 lb, reduced to 27,515 lb; 27,515 lb (b)

Images

SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34012 at at Eastleigh Shed 1966
Date Photo Taken: 14/08/1966
Date Uploaded 18/07/2016
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 229
Comments: 0


Southern Railway/Bulleid BR Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34012 'Launceston' at at Eastleigh Shed on 14th August 1966. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in October 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh in January 1958, it was withdrawn from 71B Bournemouth shed in December 1966 and cut up by Cashmores, Newport in May 1967.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.

They were designed to be lighter in weight than their sister locomotives, the Merchant Navy class, to permit use on a wider variety of routes, including in the south-west of England and the Kent coast. They were a mixed-traffic design, being equally adept at hauling passenger and freight trains, and were used on all types of services, frequently far below their capabilities. A total of 110 locomotives were constructed between 1945 and 1950, named after West Country resorts and Royal Air Force (RAF) and other subjects associated with the Battle of Britain.

Due to problems with some of the new features, such as the Bulleid chain-driven valve gear, sixty locomotives were rebuilt by British Railways during the late 1950s. This produced a design highly similar to the rebuilt Merchant Navy class. The classes operated until July 1967, when the last steam locomotives on the Southern Region were withdrawn. Although most were scrapped, twenty locomotives found new homes on heritage railways in Britain.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.


SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34012 at at Eastleigh Shed 1966
Date Photo Taken: 14/08/1966
Date Uploaded 18/07/2016
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 343
Comments: 0


The cab of Southern Railway/Bulleid BR Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34012 'Launceston' at at Eastleigh Shed on 14th August 1966. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in October 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh in January 1958, it was withdrawn from 71B Bournemouth shed in December 1966 and cut up by Cashmores, Newport in May 1967.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.

They were designed to be lighter in weight than their sister locomotives, the Merchant Navy class, to permit use on a wider variety of routes, including in the south-west of England and the Kent coast. They were a mixed-traffic design, being equally adept at hauling passenger and freight trains, and were used on all types of services, frequently far below their capabilities. A total of 110 locomotives were constructed between 1945 and 1950, named after West Country resorts and Royal Air Force (RAF) and other subjects associated with the Battle of Britain.

Due to problems with some of the new features, such as the Bulleid chain-driven valve gear, sixty locomotives were rebuilt by British Railways during the late 1950s. This produced a design highly similar to the rebuilt Merchant Navy class. The classes operated until July 1967, when the last steam locomotives on the Southern Region were withdrawn. Although most were scrapped, twenty locomotives found new homes on heritage railways in Britain.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

A schoolboy trainspotter looks out from the cab


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Last Updated : 14/08/1966

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