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British Railway Steam Locomotive

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Please read this statement on the accuracy of the data shown below

Note: To Obtain Consistency in the Steam System, Shed Codes used are those Registered at Nationalisation on 1st January 1948
Number34010 b
2nd Grouping Number
1st Grouping Numbersr 110
2nd Pre Grouping Number
1st Pre Grouping Number
Works/Lot Number
NameSidmouth
Class CodeWCBB
DesignerBulleid
Designation4-6-2
Built30/09/1945
Builder
1948 Shed72A Exmouth Junction
Last Shed71A Eastleigh
Withdrawn31/03/1965
Disposal details
DisposalPreserved
NotesRenumbered Jan 1950. Rebuilt Eastleigh Jan 1959. Grouping No: 21C110 Status: Awaiting restoration by Southern Locomotives Ltd. http://www.southern-locomotives.co.uk

Class Information

Introduced 1945. Bulleid 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' lightweight development of his 'Merchant Navy' Class with air smoothed casing, high boiler pressure, multiple-jet blastpipe and chain-driven Bulleid valve gear.

Locod originally built for use on the Eastern Section were given 'Battle of Britain' names, While locos originally built for use in the West of England were given 'West Country' names.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

(a) Temporarily converted for oil burning in 1947, then reconverted back.

(b) Rebuilt from 1957 with lower boiler pressure, Walschaerts valve gear, multiple-jet blastpipe and large diameter chimney. Air smoothing removed.

(c) 34036 = both (a) and (b)

(e) 34064 Fitted with Geisl oblong ejector in 1962.

Weight:
Loco 86 tons 0 cwt, 90 tons 1 cwt (b) Driving Wheel: 6' 2"
Tend 40 tons 10 cwt to Boil Press: 280lb/sq in Su then reduced
50 tons 0 cwt (various) to 250lb/sq in Su; 250lb/sq in Su (b)
Cylinders: Valve Gear: Bulleid (piston valves)
Walschaerts (piston valves)(b)
Three 16 3/8" x 24" TE: 31,050 lb, reduced to 27,515 lb; 27,515 lb (b)

Images

SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34010 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 11/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 2892
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

Southern Railway/BR rebuilt Bulleid Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34010 'Sidmouth' at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in September 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh works Jan 1959, it was withdrawn from 71A Eastleigh shed in March 1965 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It was rescued and is now preserved by Southern Locomotives Ltd. It is currently based at the Swanage Railway where it is under restoration - http://www.swanagerailway.co.uk/

34010 Sidmouth is Southern Locomotives' second oldest loco; only Norman is older. It was the tenth Light Pacific to be built, in September 1945, and ran on BR until withdrawn in March 1965 when it was moved to Barry scrap yard. There it lay until 1982 when it was bought by Mr Graeme Walton-Binns and moved to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. The plan was that the NYMR would restore the loco and use it on the line, however the resources to do this proved to be unavailable. After 15 years at Grosmont it was offered to two SLL supporters, Norman Taylor and Peter Wood, though it was finally acquired by SLL and moved to Sellindge in 1997 where work commenced.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.

A schoolboy trainspotter in his school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, pullover, short trousers and knee socks, looks out of the cab. By 1966, school caps and shorts were no longer worn by the vast majority of boys, only public and grammar schools hanging on to them.


SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34010 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 11/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 3460
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

Southern Railway/BR rebuilt Bulleid Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34010 'Sidmouth' at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in September 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh works Jan 1959, it was withdrawn from 71A Eastleigh shed in March 1965 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It was rescued and is now preserved by Southern Locomotives Ltd. It is currently based at the Swanage Railway where it is under restoration - http://www.swanagerailway.co.uk/

34010 Sidmouth is Southern Locomotives' second oldest loco; only Norman is older. It was the tenth Light Pacific to be built, in September 1945, and ran on BR until withdrawn in March 1965 when it was moved to Barry scrap yard. There it lay until 1982 when it was bought by Mr Graeme Walton-Binns and moved to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. The plan was that the NYMR would restore the loco and use it on the line, however the resources to do this proved to be unavailable. After 15 years at Grosmont it was offered to two SLL supporters, Norman Taylor and Peter Wood, though it was finally acquired by SLL and moved to Sellindge in 1997 where work commenced.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.

A schoolboy trainspotter in his school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, pullover, short trousers and knee socks, can be seen climbing up the tender's ladder at the rear of the loco. By 1966, school caps and shorts were no longer worn by the vast majority of boys, only public and grammar schools hanging on to them.


SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34010 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 13/09/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 1299
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

A view of Woodham Brothers lower scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966 from the cab roof of Southern Railway/BR Bulleid rebuilt Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34010 'Sidmouth'. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in September 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh works Jan 1959, it was withdrawn from 71A Eastleigh shed in March 1965 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It was rescued and is now preserved by Southern Locomotives Ltd. It is currently based at the Swanage Railway where it is under restoration - http://www.swanagerailway.co.uk/

34010 Sidmouth is Southern Locomotives' second oldest loco; only Norman is older. It was the tenth Light Pacific to be built, in September 1945, and ran on BR until withdrawn in March 1965 when it was moved to Barry scrap yard. There it lay until 1982 when it was bought by Mr Graeme Walton-Binns and moved to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. The plan was that the NYMR would restore the loco and use it on the line, however the resources to do this proved to be unavailable. After 15 years at Grosmont it was offered to two SLL supporters, Norman Taylor and Peter Wood, though it was finally acquired by SLL and moved to Sellindge in 1997 where work commenced.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.


SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34010 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 13/09/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 1323
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

A view of Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966 from the cab of Southern Railway/BR Bulleid rebuilt Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34010 'Sidmouth'. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in September 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh works Jan 1959, it was withdrawn from 71A Eastleigh shed in March 1965 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It was rescued and is now preserved by Southern Locomotives Ltd. It is currently based at the Swanage Railway where it is under restoration - http://www.swanagerailway.co.uk/

34010 Sidmouth is Southern Locomotives' second oldest loco; only Norman is older. It was the tenth Light Pacific to be built, in September 1945, and ran on BR until withdrawn in March 1965 when it was moved to Barry scrap yard. There it lay until 1982 when it was bought by Mr Graeme Walton-Binns and moved to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. The plan was that the NYMR would restore the loco and use it on the line, however the resources to do this proved to be unavailable. After 15 years at Grosmont it was offered to two SLL supporters, Norman Taylor and Peter Wood, though it was finally acquired by SLL and moved to Sellindge in 1997 where work commenced.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.


SR/BR Bulleid Class WC 4-6-2 No. 34010 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1966
Date Photo Taken: 18/08/1966
Date Uploaded 13/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 5150
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

Southern Railway/BR rebuilt Bulleid Class West Country 4-6-2 Pacific No. 34010 'Sidmouth' at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 18th August 1966. Built at Brighton Works, it entered traffic in September 1945. Rebuilt at Eastleigh works Jan 1959, it was withdrawn from 71A Eastleigh shed in March 1965 and sold for scrap to Woodham Bros of Barry in South Wales. It was rescued and is now preserved by Southern Locomotives Ltd. It is currently based at the Swanage Railway where it is under restoration - http://www.swanagerailway.co.uk/

34010 Sidmouth is Southern Locomotives' second oldest loco; only Norman is older. It was the tenth Light Pacific to be built, in September 1945, and ran on BR until withdrawn in March 1965 when it was moved to Barry scrap yard. There it lay until 1982 when it was bought by Mr Graeme Walton-Binns and moved to the North Yorkshire Moors Railway. The plan was that the NYMR would restore the loco and use it on the line, however the resources to do this proved to be unavailable. After 15 years at Grosmont it was offered to two SLL supporters, Norman Taylor and Peter Wood, though it was finally acquired by SLL and moved to Sellindge in 1997 where work commenced.

Although separately called 'West Country' and 'Battle of Britain' Classes, there were no design differences, the locomotives being identical, apart for their names.

The SR West Country and Battle of Britain classes, collectively known as Light Pacifics or informally as Spam Cans, are air-smoothed 4-6-2 Pacific steam locomotives designed for the Southern Railway by its Chief Mechanical Engineer Oliver Bulleid. Incorporating a number of new developments in British steam locomotive technology, they were amongst the first British designs to use welding in the construction process, and to use steel fireboxes, which meant that components could be more easily constructed under wartime austerity and post-war economy.

A schoolboy trainspotter in his school uniform of peaked school cap, shirt, tie, pullover, short trousers and knee socks, can be seen leaning out of the cab. By 1966, school caps and shorts were no longer worn by the vast majority of boys, only public and grammar schools hanging on to them.


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Last Updated : 18/08/1966

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