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British Railway Steam Locomotive

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Please read this statement on the accuracy of the data shown below

Note: To Obtain Consistency in the Steam System, Shed Codes used are those Registered at Nationalisation on 1st January 1948
Number
2nd Grouping Number
1st Grouping Numbersr 681
2nd Pre Grouping Number
1st Pre Grouping Numberlsw 681
Works/Lot NumberT6-5
Class CodeT6
DesignerAdams W
Designation4-4-0
Built31/12/1895
BuilderNine Elms (LSWR)
1948 Shed
Last Shed70D Basingstoke
Withdrawn30/06/1943
Disposal detailsEastleigh Works (B.R.)
DisposalCut Up
Disposal Date31/07/1944

Class Information

The LSWR T6 class was a class of express passenger 4-4-0 steam locomotives designed for the London and South Western Railway by William Adams. Ten were constructed at Nine Elms Locomotive Works between 18851886. The class were numbered 677686, and were a development of the X2 class, based on experience gained with the locomotives in traffic. The boiler was based on that used in the T3 class, and shared the main dimensions.

Although with two designations, X2 and T6, and some differencies these two classes were considered to be one class with driving of 7ft 1ins. The first X2 left Nine Elms in June 1890, to be followed by nineteen more by May 1892. Then in the September 1895 the first of the T6 engines left the works to be followed by another nine by May 1896, making an overall total of thirty engines. These engines, together with the T3 class and X6 class 4-4-0s, were very successful locomotives lasting well into Southern Railway days, with the final withdrawal not taking place until 1945. These four classes represented the pinnacle of Adam's career and were at least on a par with, and in many cases better than, contemporary locomotives of other lines. They had a suspension that minimised the tendency for outside cylinder locomotives to be unsteady which, together with their long wheelbase, did in fact lead to very smooth running. When the equalizing beams were removed later in their lives the running was considerably impaired.

The build of the first twenty locomotives did vary a bit with the second ten, numbers 587 to 596, built to order F3, though still designated as class X2. The only differences being the first five 'X2' engines had separate splasher casings whilst the remaining fifteen engines had small segmental covers enclosing the top centres of their coupling rods. Unlike previous Adams locomotives, these had their sandboxes beneath the footplate and a rather ornate rendering of the company's intertwined initials on the front splasher.

All passed to the Southern Railway at the grouping in 1923. Withdrawals started in 1933, and by the end of 1937 only two remained. No. 684 went in May 1940, and the last, 681 was retired in July 1943. All were scrapped.

Table of locomotive orders
Year Order Qty LSWR Nos
1895 T6 10 677686

The first loco withdrawn was SR 677 in February 1933 from Salisbury shed.
The last loco withdrawn was SR 681 in July 1943 from Basingstoke shed.

Technical Details

Designer : William Adams
Builder : LSWR Nine Elms Works
Introduced : 1895
Build date : 18951896
Total prduced : 10
Configuration : 4-4-0
UIC classification : 2'Bn
Gauge : 4 ft 8 in (1,435 mm)
Leading wheel diameter : 3 ft 9 in (1.162 m)
Driver wheel diameter : 7 ft 1 in (2.159 m)
Bogie Wheel diameter : 3 ft 7ins
Length : 54 ft 5 5/8 in (16.60 m)
Height : 13 ft 2 in (4.03 m)
Axle load : 16.20 long tons (16.46 t)
Weight on drivers : 31.70 long tons (32.21 t)
Locomotive weight : 50.125 long tons (50.929 t)
Total weight : 83 tons 6 cwt
Tender weight : 36.20 long tons (36.78 t)
Fuel type : Coal
Coal capacity : 5 tons
Water capacity : 3,300 imperial gallons (15,000 l; 4,000 US gal)
Boiler pressure : 175 lb sq in (1.21 MPa)
Cylinders : Two (outside)
Cylinder size : 19 in 26 in (483 mm 660 mm)
Tractive effort : 22,150 lbs
Career : LSWR, Southern Railway
Power class : SR; I
Withdrawn : 19331943
Disposition : All scrapped

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