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Wed 22 Nov 2017 14:49:07


 
 

Steam Locomotive Shed

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6 4
C

Dalry Road

Shed Information

Date Shed Closed to Steam: 03/10/1965

OS Map Ref: NT23757260

 

1948 or First Allocation from Dalry Road - Total 52

 

40911
41177
41178
42173
42174
42268

42269
42270
42271
42272
42273
42804

42807
44318
44704
44705
44931
45029

47162
47163
48163
48321
54451 a
54452 a

54478
54507
55125 a
55139 a
55165
55166

55177
55189
55202
55210
55229 a
55233 a

56236 a
56253
56283
56312
56313
56329

57550
57553
57559
57565
57576
57578

57645
57654
57659
57674


Locos Withdrawn from Dalry Road - Total 49

 

40911
41178
42168
42172
42272

44702
44975
44976
44994
45022

45023
45030
45036
45086
45155

45170
45183
45358
45360
45367

54478
55124
55139 a
55165
55166

55177
55210
55229 a
56253
56283

57550
57559
57560
57565
57578

57591
57634
57645
57654
61134

61242
61245
61351
64495
64500

64501
64517
65271
69187


Locos 1948 or First Allocation and Withdrawn from Dalry Road - Total 18

 

40911
41178

42272
54478

55139 a
55165

55166
55177

55210
55229 a

56253
56283

57550
57559

57565
57578

57645
57654


Images for Dalry Road Shed

LMS/BR McIntosh Class 439 0-4-4 Tank No. 55189 at Dalry Road Shed 1964
Date Photo Taken: 16/05/1964
Date Uploaded 09/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 2785
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear

LMS/BR McIntosh Caledonian '439' or 'Standard Passenger' Class 0-4-4 tank No. 55189 at Dalry Road shed on 16th May 1964. Built at St. Rollox works in January 1908, it was withdrawn from 64D Carstairs shed in December 1962. CR 419, (later LMS number 15189, BR 55189) has been preserved and is the flagship of the Scottish Railway Preservation Society. It is currently undergoing a major overhaul and is temporarily out of service. Apart from the driving axle boxes needing to be replaced the engine is in sound mechanical condition and should be back in service towards the end of the 2014 running season.

The Caledonian Railway 439 Class was a class of 0-4-4T steam locomotives. It was a development of earlier Caledonian Railway 0-4-4T locomotives, including the 19 Class and 92 Class, and predecessor of the 431 Class. The 439 Class was introduced by John F. McIntosh in 1900 and a modified version was introduced by William Pickersgill in 1915. Ninety-two engines of the class were built between 1900 and 1925, a few under LMS auspices. Seventy-four Class 439s passed into British Railways ownership in 1948 and they were numbered 55159-55236 (with gaps).

This photo was taken while visiting Edinburgh for the 'The Queen's College Railway & Transport Society Flying Scotsman Rail Tour' which ran from Edinburgh Waverley to Aberdeen and return.

A trainspotter, Johhny Walker, stands in front of the loco wearing a bobble hat, anorak and trousers.


BR/GWR Collett 4-6-0 Class 6000 King No. 6024 at Woodham Brothers Scrapyard 1965
Date Photo Taken: 16/05/1964
Date Uploaded 09/07/2014
Image Owner/Copyright: Howie Milburn
Views: 11039
Comments: 0

This picture also appears in this album : Trainspotting in the 1950s and 1960s and What We Used to Wear
This picture also appears in this album : The Story of Woodham Brothers Ltd and Barry Scrapyard

BR/GWR C. B. Collett Class Class 6000 King No. 6024 'King Edward I' at at Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales on 12th August 1965. Built at Swindon Works in June 1930. It was withdrawn from 86C Cardiff Canton shed in June 1962, and sent to Swindon for breaking up. However, in light of the instalation of a new bridge west of Bristol towards South Wales, it was coupled to its twin, 6023 King Edward II, and towed to the bridge for weight testing purposes Resultantly, with them now being closer to South Wales than Swindon, both locomotives survived and ended up being sold to Woodham Brothers scrapyard in Barry, South Wales, where they languished in the company of 300 other locomotives.

Inspired by preserved class-mate No. 6000 King George V's 1971 breach of British Rail's steam ban, in 1973 the King Preservation Society wanted to restore a locomotive to mainline condition. Both Nos. 6023 and 6024 were available for purchase, but No. 6024 was preferred, because after a derailment in the Barry yard No. 6023 had had its rear driving wheels torched through, and at the time was considered beyond repair.

No 6024 was bought for £4,000 in 1974, but, like many of the other remaining locomotives, was missing significant components, including: its double-chimney (currently fitted to No. 6000); piston, connecting and eccentric rods; and its slide-bars had been cut through.

The 36th locomotive to be rescued from Barry, No. 6024 was moved to the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre at Quainton Road. After 16 years, including the creation of the Club100 funding initiative, on 2 February 1989, No. 6024 moved again under its own power. Re-commissioned on 26 April 1989 by HRH the Duke of Gloucester, in October 1989 the engine was moved by low-loader from Quainton Road to the Birmingham Railway Museum, from where it completed its mainline test runs. On 15 April 1990, it resumed its mainline career hauling revenue-earning passenger trains.

The locomotive is currently undergoing a 10 yearly heavy general overhaul at the West Somerset Railway's workshops at Minehead, Somerset, from April 2012.

Three Kings are preserved; 6000 'King George V' at the National Railway Museum, York on static display. Only original height King; 6023 'King Edward II' at the Great Western Society, Didcot Railway Centre and is operational; 6024 'King Edward I' owned by Jeremy Hosking is at the West Somerset Railway. Its main line certificate expired March 2012, with overhaul scheduled to take place at the West Somerset Railway. The latter two were both rescued from Woodham Brothers scrapyard, Barry, Wales.

The Great Western Railway 6000 Class or King was a class of 4-6-0 steam locomotive designed for express passenger work. With the exception of one Pacific (The Great Bear), they were the largest locomotives the GWR built. They were named after kings of the United Kingdom and of England, beginning with the reigning monarch, King George V, and going back through history. Following the death of King George V, the highest-numbered engine was renamed after his successor; and following the abdication of the latter, the next-highest engine was also renamed after the new King. The class was designed under the direction of C. B. Collett, as an enlarged version of Collett's Castle Class, which in turn was an enlargement of George Jackson Churchward's Star Class.

A trainspotter, Howie Milburn, with an Ilford Sportsman camera and wearing a polo neck shirt, jacket and trousers rises from the steam pipe which has just collapsed while he sat on it!


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